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If a Robot Slips in Popcorn Butter, Who Picks It Up?

Jun 07, 2018

The Same Human Species Who Conquers 5D!

NECA’s safety conference was just held, and it’s reasonable to assume that the topic of robots slipping in popcorn butter was not covered under fall protection. No joke, the Amazon Warehouse Robots that have been written about and filmed time and again, literally slipped and fell on popcorn butter. The greasy substance had apparently been knocked from a shelf, and the robots ran over it many times. Amazon’s Chief Technologist, Tye Brady, was at MIT on Tuesday, June 5, and reported the incident to a listening audience attending EmTech Next, MITs symposium on the future of artificial intelligence and robots in the workforce. No, there is no video but, we can hope that videos of robots falling in fountains and slipping on banana peels will soon rival those of cats doing anything!

So, the answer to the question “If a Robot slips in Popcorn Butter, Who Picks It up?”, is of course, a human being who works alongside or in near proximity to the robot. The same was true when the 300-pound Cop Robot patrolling the sidewalks in Silicon Valley toppled over. It took 2 human cops to stand it up and set it back on patrol. Amazon maintains robots are here to assist and work alongside humans, not take their jobs. It’s a good thing, or they’d still be face down in popcorn butter.

Learn more about Amazon's movie-ready robots

In other tech news, researchers at the UKs University of South Hampton have harnessed 5D and placed incredible amounts of information on a small glass disc, capable of storing 3000X the data we cram onto CDs. The data placed on the glass discs can last 13.8 billion years and withstand temperatures of 1000 degrees Celsius! They’ve already stored the entire Bible, the UN Declaration of Human Rights, and most appropriately Isaac Newton’s “Opticks: A Treatise of Reflexions, Refractions, Inflexions and Colours of Light” on the 5D glass disc. No doubt, there will be a safety procedure for robots encountering popcorn butter to be stored and downloaded from a 5D glass disc in the future.

Watch Video of 5D Data Storage on a small glass disc:

5d glassClick to Watch


NECA Technology – the Project for Applied and Disruptive Technology, explores the world of technology and keeps members informed of what’s happening today, and of what will be launched in the not-too-distant future.  Dr. Joey Shorter has an extensive background in education and experience in translating the work of academics into understandable, practical ideas.