NECA TransmissionsNotes from the front lines of the electrical contracting industry

The NECA Field Service

Posted on Mar 24, 2008 by John M Grau

The idea for NECA “field service” came in the late 1930’s when the Labor Relations Committee reasoned that NECA could negotiate better terms with the IBEW if it represented a significant portion of IBEW-labor employers. The committee adopted a set of seven objectives to guide the work of one field representative whose first objective was membership. The fifth objective was “to give assistance to contractors locally, as needed.”

In May 1939, NECA hired Paul Geary, former manger of the Youngstown, Ohio Chapter, as its first full-time traveling representative. He had one primary goal: Build members’ bargaining strength by soliciting electrical contractors to join and work together.

As NECA’s lone field representative, Geary soon found himself concentrating less on his first objective to build bargaining strength and considerably more on his fifth to assist contractors locally. In an October 1941 report to the Committee, he wrote:

When this Committee adopted that objective, I am sure that it did not fully appreciate how far it was “sticking its neck out.” I am sure that it did not foresee that our Local Chapters and members would need and desire so much assistance as they have; much less, that they would not only request it, but would demand it, backing up their demands with threats that they would drop their N.E.C.A. membership if we didn’t get them exactly what they wanted, when they wanted it. What they want ranges anywhere from the total extermination of Journeymen (working) contractors, to the removal of an alleged uncooperative, incompetent or dishonest Union Representative. Performing under this objective has taken up at least 80% of your Representative’s time and the expense connected therewith represents of course a proportionately large share of your revenue.

Today the NECA field service team is a vital component in NECA’s service to its members. It is comprised of 16 field representatives organized into four regional offices, each under the direction of a regional executive director.

Unique among trade associations in the construction industry, NECA’s field service is the link that connects the national organization with independent local chapters and local members.

More on the field service in my next post.

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NECA Transmissions is a collaborative effort from CEO John Grau and NECA staff to provide insight and feedback on key issues from the front lines of the electrical contracting industry.

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