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Minneapolis-Based Parsons Electric Takes on Hotel Casino Expansion Project

Jun 09, 2017

Fostering productive relationships and delivering results have become hallmarks of Parsons Electric. And one bond, in particular, is only strengthening over time.

ParsonsMysticCasinoParsons Electric, a member of the National Electrical Contractors Association’s St. Paul Chapter, and IBEW Local 292 have teamed up on the electrical work for the expansion of the Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, which is owned and operated by the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community (SMSC) in Prior Lake, southwest of Minneapolis. Almost 25 years ago, the contractor was involved when the original building was constructed and during subsequent remodels. Its current project began in August 2016.

The Mystic Lake Casino Hotel & Convention Center Addition project includes an expansion of the existing 586-room hotel and convention center, which will result in a new 180-room, 12-story hotel and a new 60,000 square-foot convention center. It is set to be completed by mid-December, in time for the festivities surrounding Super Bowl LII at U.S. Bank Stadium in February.

“It more upscale than the most of the casinos in the area,” Mike Kunz, Construction Executive at Parsons Electric. “It’s going to for a Vegas feel.”

visitstpaul-mysticlake
 Image credit: visitsaintpaul.com

Established in 1927, the Minnesota-based electrical contractor provides an extensive range of services through its three divisions – electrical construction, electrical service, and technologies – to ensure customers have the latest technology and an unmatched expertise. The company, which does more than $300 million in contracts annually, was ranked No. 1 on the area business journal’s annual list of electrical contractors in 2017.

Parsons Electric’s track record of success working with SMSC. The tribal government approved the plans, which do not need any municipal approvals. It declined to disclose the value of the expansion, according to the Minneapolis/St. Paul Business Journal, but it estimates the project will create about 400 construction jobs and about 100 permanent jobs.

Kunz said there are about 40 workers on Parsons Electric’s team, including 35 electricians on the field staff. According to requirements of its bid, at least 25 percent of the workforce is Native American and at least 20 percent of the works is being done by a Native American subcontractor. In this case, the subcontractor Elliott Contracting, a local firm in Fridley.

“It was our bid, but they were our partner in this,” Kunz said.

Among the upgrade’s features are a lighting control system and nearly all LED fixtures. Suspended ceilings featuring custom chandeliers and state-of-the-art audio/video and security systems are also being installed. Two distributors will have generator-backup capability.

Kunz added that his team utilized modeling to help coordinate with other trades. Two BIM modelers worked hand in hand with the foreman for eight months to make sure there weren’t any collisions. Surveying equipment was used as well.

“We’ve put as much of the electrical infrastructure underground as possible,” Kunz said of the limited ceiling space.

Looking forward, Kunz said Parsons Electric has been active in the upper Midwest. It has done work on projects for the University of Minnesota and a joint venture with the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings. It also takes on one major hospital job every year. One current project is a 374-unit condo building in downtown Minneapolis.

”We’re very diverse in what we do,” Kunz said.